Worker Certification & Qualification

Mission Statement, Goals & Objectives, Purpose and Acceptance, How to Use the Standards, History of the Standards
johnleeke
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Worker Certification & Qualification

Postby johnleeke » July 5th, 2011, 6:47 am

Amy writes:
Often the longevity of the patch, either dutchman or epoxy comes down to the person putting it in. If they make an ill-fitting dutchman or don't mix the epoxy right then the patch will probably fail quite quick.


I would say the character and quality of the work always depends on the person doing the work. This is one of the Great Conundrums of this whole standards project:

Since success in this window preservation work depends largely (or even entirely) on the skill and knowledge of the workers, how can we assure successful work? The construction industry tries to do this by specifying products, and clearly that is not enough for this work. So far, here at the standards project we are taking it to documenting the methods, procedures and materials we are using; but is this enough? Can standards even be set on worker knowledge and skills?

We have just added a new section for all of the standards here, and it is how to judge the quality of the results of the work, by having a "Quality of Results" section in each standard treatment, where we describe how to recognize best work, adequate work and inadequate work.

Quality of Results<describe how to recognize>:

Best Work:
Adequate Work:
Inadequate Work:

Here is an example of this for the Fill Sill Weather Checks method standard:

viewtopic.php?f=17&t=170
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

oculus
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Re: Epoxy Repairs versus Dutchman repairs

Postby oculus » July 5th, 2011, 6:06 pm

Would the standards advise some sort of minimum years in training, apprenticeship or collegiate level program? This might address the quality of work that we are advocating for.
Is the best work from someone who has the most experience or is it from the amount of time taken to do the work? Would there be some sort of national list of qualified individuals that could be generated, so that people looking for quality work will know where to go?
This might not be the best place for these questions (epoxy repairs vs. dutchman) maybe somewhere more general.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

sschoberg
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Re: Epoxy Repairs vs. Dutchman vs. Whole Part Replacement

Postby sschoberg » December 23rd, 2011, 8:13 pm

Cunundrums and judging restoration quality. Is this subject continued elswhere?

Amy's comments on training, continued education and I might ad experience in this trade does make a difference in quality-----or does it. How do we set standards of quality? How will an architect and owner decide if a low bidder on a project can actually perform quality restoration work? Maybe this can't be included in the standards. Perhaps a list of restorers and their credentials such as previous projects and past architect referrels.

johnleeke
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Re: Worker Certification & Qualification

Postby johnleeke » December 24th, 2011, 11:04 am

Steve, I have split off the message about certification & qualification and set up this new discussion:

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=176&p=405#p405
John
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johnleeke
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Re: Worker Certification & Qualification

Postby johnleeke » December 24th, 2011, 11:22 am

Amy writes:
>>Would the standards advise some sort of minimum years in training, apprenticeship or collegiate level program? <<

This could be in the standards, but for this first edition we are trying to focus on documenting methods that have proven to be effective, just to get this first edition done and out the door in a reasonable time.

To include standards on training, etc. there would have to be strong training programs for the standards to refer to. Right now, there are a few programs with many years of development, and several programs with a few years that are now developing and growing.

As these training programs mature, it might be possible to set standards on training.

One use of these Standards we are working on now would be in training, apprentice and academic programs, since the Standards will be a catalog of the methods that are known to be effective. Some of the Advisers, active in the project now are here to make sure this is the case. These Standards will identify what are the good window preservation methods to be promoted, and how to recognize them when they are in use. These Standards will not include how to do the methods. That is the work of the training programs. A training program could use the current Standards to make sure their trainees are learning all of the best methods and practices.
John
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Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
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Re: Worker Certification & Qualification

Postby johnleeke » December 24th, 2011, 12:01 pm

Steve wonders:
>>Amy's comments on training, continued education and, I might add, experience, in this trade does make a difference in quality-----or does it. <<

Yes, experience does make a very important difference in the quality of work, which is why we are focusing on experience in this Standards project. For example, all of the Founders, who are major contributors to the Standards, have decades of experience in window preservation. Any of the Advisers or Stakeholders with decades of experience can submit a work method to be consider as a standard. In this way the Standards draw on and reflect the experience of many.

By the way, Steve, when I think of you, I think of your experience working with contemporary windows as counting in the overall experience that you bring to your window preservation work, and to the Standards project as well.

>>How will an architect and owner decide if a low bidder on a project can actually perform quality restoration work? <<


There are two items in the Standard's Window Project Organization topic that help assure experience is brought to every window project:

1. Assemble the Window Team, must include significant input from a window specialist with extensive hands-on experience, and may also include a representative for the building owner, a project manager, an architect, etc…

and

7. Work samples and method demonstrations…

Work samples is one of the most direct ways to help assure quality of work. One or a few windows are done as a preliminary demonstration of the capability of the workers. The owner or architect can examine the work samples as they are done, and the completed work to judge the quality of the work and decide if it is suitable for the rest of the work. If it is not suitable then measures can be taken, such as finding other workers, or training the workers to improve the quality of their work, or selecting other methods that the workers can use to product quality work.

Here is the whole Window Project Organization topic:

http://www.ptnresource.org/WPSC_forum/v ... f=10&t=163


>>How do we set standards of quality? ... Maybe this can't be included in the standards.<<

Yes it can, it definitely is being included right now. Each treatment standard has a Quality of Work section. For example, check out this standard on Fill Sill Weather Checks:

http://www.ptnresource.org/WPSC_forum/v ... f=17&t=170

where there are details that show how to determine the quality of the work.

>> Perhaps a list of restorers and their credentials such as previous projects and past architect referrals.<<

This is a good idea, but it is beyond the scope of the current project. To provide such a list in a fair and reasonable way takes a huge amount of work. I know about this first hand because I have compiled and published such a list of nearly 300 window specialists. Often such accreditations and lists are compiled and maintained by national organizations (think of the AIA and AMA). and, so far, no national organizations have emerged for window specialists.

It is possible that the WPSC could develop into such a national organization, but right now we've got our hands full just getting the first edition of the Standards out the door.

One of the interesting things that will be included in the Standards book is a listing of all the people who have contributed their time, expertise, and dollars to the project. Also, each treatment standard will include its author's name and the names of any who have contributed to that standard. The main reason for including this is because we have a strong "credit where credit is due" guideline. A minor benefit is that readers of the Standards will be able to see who knows about the standards in the fundamental way of having contributed to them.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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