Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

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johnleeke
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Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby johnleeke » March 8th, 2012, 3:27 pm

Steve Schoberg writes:
I think what is becoming obvious is the documentation of what has been done to each window will serve the structure and owner and subsequent owners in the best manner. Maybe helping the homeowner establish a structural history of repairs should be part of our education of our customers. A special part of the standards could give guidelines for doing this. I like this idea and I think it can be used to help our customers in choosing us as their professional of choice for restoring their windows.


In fact, on some preservation projects it is a requirement to provide documentation of the treatments used, or "work as done". With these Standards that might be more easily done by simply using the standard treatment names or numbers and then including a copy of the Standards in with the completion report.

Amy, I know you do this level of "work as done" documentation. Could you comment here?
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

oculus
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Joined: May 18th, 2011, 12:15 am

Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby oculus » March 8th, 2012, 5:01 pm

Yes, I do a lot of documentation of the repairs I complete for each window. Right now in fact I am trying out a different way of documenting work. I have a rather large project to be done this summer at the Cottage Grove Armory (link to some pics http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/2011/11/cottage-grove-armory.html) and as part of my initial window assessment I have worked up another sheet that shows each window and the repairs that I am recommending. I will use this sheet as a guide and when completing the repairs make notes accordingly. But remember I am way over the top with this sort of thing. I don't think we should expect others to go to this extreme.
I will post a sample of my assessment sheets and the repair logs. I think some of you have already seen them in person.
Last edited by oculus on March 9th, 2012, 12:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

oculus
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Joined: May 18th, 2011, 12:15 am

Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby oculus » March 8th, 2012, 6:27 pm

Here is my repair log. This was back in 2008 so the repair logs have changed but I still like this method though.
Attachments
SKMBT_C45212030814471_0002.jpg
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

oculus
Posts: 66
Joined: May 18th, 2011, 12:15 am

Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby oculus » March 8th, 2012, 6:33 pm

Here is also some hardware documentation as well. All these things go into a binder. The whole thing is copied twice and one set sent to SHPO for the house file and the other is sent to the client. I don't do hardware documentation unless specified by the client or there seems to be a need for it. On this particular project the structure is in a ghost town in rural SW Oregon. The building is left open at all times and the likely hood of the hardware walking away seemed high. (link-http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/search/label/Historic%201860s%20Church%20in%20Golden)
Again I want to stress that a lot of this is not for every project.
Attachments
SKMBT_C45212030814471_0001.jpg
Last edited by oculus on March 9th, 2012, 12:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

sschoberg
Posts: 49
Joined: June 9th, 2011, 9:43 pm

Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby sschoberg » March 8th, 2012, 11:11 pm

Your right Amy your documentation is (albeit just fantastic), is over the top for your average restoration company to his average restoration customer. Maybe a slightly simpler, set of documentation forms, approved by WPSC can be made available.

The intent of my comment regarding this is---to show that a customer has chosen a repair option that they can afford rather than the option that may be needed. An example would be if the botten ends of a window jamb are rotted and should be repair with a splice with a like kind piece of wood. This would be much more time consuming and therefore much more expensive than using a block of wood attached to the bottom of the weight pocket and the jamb securing it with screws (as was recently suggested in another post) Sometimes the customer just cannot afford to have the recommended repair done by us. Having the chosen repair documented as well as the recommended repair, demonstrated due diligence by the restorer and acceptability by the customer. Documentation follows ownership of the home or building so when home's new owner sees a less than ultimate window repair, they will be able to see in the documentation that the repair is the one that was chosen at the time. May help save a reputation of a particular restorer and also shows the new homeowner and any new restorer what was done and for what reason.

johnleeke
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Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby johnleeke » March 9th, 2012, 2:08 pm

It's up to the window specialist and the building owner to determine what level of documentation or repair is needed.

Simple documentation is just as valid as complex documentation. Simple low-cost contemporary repairs are just as valid as high-cost traditional repairs.

There can be two standards for documentation, one for simple and one for complex.

Amy is writing a standard for her level of complex documentation.

You could write the one for simple documentation that is designed to meet your needs.

Steve, I hope you will submit something on simplified documentation. Just show us how you do it.

Most of the time I don't even use a standard form, I just sketch something up on the spot, make photocopies and use it. It's clear that Amy's form above is hand-sketched to meet her own needs.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
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Location: Portland, Maine
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Re: Documenting Treatments Used for Completion Reports

Postby johnleeke » March 9th, 2012, 2:43 pm

Steve writes:
Having the chosen repair documented as well as the recommended repair, demonstrated due diligence by the restorer and acceptability by the customer. Documentation follows ownership of the home or building so when home's new owner sees a less than ultimate window repair, they will be able to see in the documentation that the repair is the one that was chosen at the time. May help save a reputation of a particular restorer and also shows the new homeowner and any new restorer what was done and for what reason.


I have to say that it is refreshing to hear you say this, from your practical tradesman's point of view, because this is exactly why and how we use detailed complex documentation on recognized historic buildings. (and I am thinking of a particular historic building that I have worked on for over two decades here in Portland that is on the National Register of Historic Places)

I an going to paraphrase your quote above for the "How to use the standards" topic. You can see that right here:
viewtopic.php?p=355#p355
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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