Craft Practice Documentation

Mission Statement, Goals & Objectives, Purpose and Acceptance, How to Use the Standards, History of the Standards
johnleeke
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Craft Practice Documentation

Postby johnleeke » June 18th, 2011, 12:50 pm

David Ottinger writes:
>>Is there a recommended easy to use format or system for documenting the sash and repairs, glass within the sash (which typically is uniquely scribed and fit in eighteenth century N.E. sash) and some sort of simple report accompanying the project with the materials (especially paint) used and a long-term maintenance plan?<<

Many of the best preservation tradespeople do keep work notes on their daily activities.

We want the Standards to include documentation of the work that is done on window.

Amy McCauley is our Adviser on Craft Practice Documentation, I'm sure she'll have some comment here.

How do you document your own work? Why? How has it proven useful?

oculus
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Joined: May 18th, 2011, 12:15 am

Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby oculus » July 5th, 2011, 12:43 am

Sorry John that I haven't responded yet on this topic, I have been away at a jobsite and am just now getting back.

So, I will run through the documentation process that I do for my projects.

The first day on a new project is spent filling out my condition assessment forms and doing photo documentation of existing conditions. I first started doing forms about 10 years ago. Mostly out of a need to accurately bid on projects with numerous windows, which at the time was a bit overwhelming. These forms have gone through various versions before I settled upon the ones I use now. My documentation process now is more focused upon accurate portrayal of each window and less upon what it will cost to repair. My main concern is if something should happen (fire, vandalism, natural disaster) to the existing sash and frame can I provide enough information so that they can be accurately re-made.

The documentation set is replicated 3 times. I keep the master copy. The second copy is given to the client, usually a city, county or non-profit organization. The final set is sent to the archives at the State Preservation Office. The sets are in both hard copy and digital.

The documentation set is comprised of:

The Condition Assessment form:
Each opening’s existing conditions are recorded here. The front of the page is for the exterior and the back is for the interior. Each page has space for a photo of the opening, date, project and client.
Next to the photo is space for location, window description, sill, frame/trim, sash, glazing putty, glazing (old or new), hardware description, details, and space for remarks. Under each of these titles is space for my remarks concerning the condition.
For the interior the space titles are location, window descriptions, stool, frame/pulley stiles, sash/muntins, trim, hardware descriptions, ropes/chains, weatherstripping, details, and remarks.

Repair Log and Glazing Inventory form:
This set is filled in during my restoration process. The space titles are date, project, window location, glazing points, notes and sheet number. There is a large space for a drawing of the sash and the notes sections is quite large as well.
Every type of glazing point is recorded along with location. All dimensions of the rails and stiles are noted. All glazing is determined to be of modern or old processes. The sash profile is recorded and all dimensions labeled. Every repair is recorded with process and reason for repair.

Remaining sheets:
-Plan drawing of structure.
-Interesting historical facts.
-Old photos
-National Registry forms
-My overall report on condition
-Maintenance schedule for windows after restoration is complete

My formal training is in scientific illustration so some of these things comes from that.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

johnleeke
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Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby johnleeke » July 5th, 2011, 6:23 am

Amy, thanks. Could you bring an example from one of your projects to the Summit?

Here's my routine.

Survey.
I quickly walk around and through the building making sketch plans or elevations of the building, numbering the windows and showing window locations. I determine the different types of windows and make an interior and exterior sketch of each type, then I name the types. I also get a general impression of their condition.

Assessment.
Each window is considered individually to determine it's condition.
I might document in one of two ways, on sketches of each window, or on a table of data with a line for each window and a column for all of the various parts and systems of the window.
For the sketches I make forms by photocopying the window-type sketch. For the data table I have several standard forms for the most common types of windows, and I might make a new one for an unusual project.

During assessment I also may determine the construction details and materials of each type, making cross-section sketches of the sill, jambs and header.

Work.
During work I document what I do to each window on a sketch form, with sketching and written notes. I also take photos and shoot video of what I'm doing.

Have I done this for every window on every project? Usually, but not always. I've regretted not doing it often enough that I now always do it.

Distribution.
I don't always distribute my documentation as conscientiously as Amy, but it does often get wider distribution as I write articles for the national journals and magazines, in my own self-published books and on the internet. This is one way that I get paid for this documentation, since my clients cannot always afford to pay for it.

I learned to keep work notes from my father, right along with learning how to do the woodworking. I've always had a clipboard in my hand or nearby in my tool box. I've still got my dad's clipboard, it's pretty beat up, you might say nearly worn out. Sometimes, just for fun, I use his clipboard instead of my own.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
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Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby johnleeke » July 5th, 2011, 7:17 am

Amy writes:
Often the longevity of the patch, either dutchman or epoxy comes down to the person putting it in. If they make an ill-fitting dutchman or don't mix the epoxy right then the patch will probably fail quite quick.


I would say the character and quality of the work always depends on the person doing the work. This is one of the Great Conundrums of this whole standards project:

Since success in this window preservation work depends largely (or even entirely) on the skill and knowledge of the workers, how can we assure successful work? The construction industry tries to do this by specifying products, and clearly that is not enough for this work. So far, here at the standards project we are taking it to documenting the methods, procedures and materials we are using; but is this enough? Can standards even be set on worker knowledge and skills?

We have just added a new section for all of the standards here, and it is how to judge the quality of the results of the work, by having a "Quality of Results" section in each standard treatment, where, for each treatment and it's standard, we describe how to recognize best work, adequate work and inadequate work.

Quality of Results<describe how to recognize>:

Best Work:
Adequate Work:
Inadequate Work:


You'll see example of this as we begin to post draft standards in the next few days.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

oculus
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Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby oculus » July 5th, 2011, 6:08 pm

Yes, John I will certainly be bringing my documentation work with me. Probably 2-3 different projects.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

sschoberg
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Joined: June 9th, 2011, 9:43 pm

Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby sschoberg » August 3rd, 2011, 6:45 am

Amy, I was really impressed with the amount and quality of your documentations.

I think there could be a standard form/forms we could all use in documenting our work. well maybe not quite as detailed as Amy does. But I think the homeowners/building owners would find this to be valuable and shows the importance we place on the continued use and repair of original windows.

Sales tool as well as the beginning of the documented history of the windows.

Kathy Morgan
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Full Name: Kathy L. Morgan
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Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby Kathy Morgan » August 3rd, 2011, 1:51 pm

Greetings from Wichita where it is 112 degrees - Yikes!!!!

I have one other suggestion on the documentation from the perspective of a property owner understanding what opening is located where. I always have plan drawings in the documentation, but I've added another component by using a full elevation photo for each side numbering the window openings consecutively beginning with the main elevation moving around the building clockwise. I then tie detail photos back to the window opening, there is less confusion for the property owner and the contractor can the information in their bid document.

I didn't get the chance to look at Amy's documentation, so maybe this is already incorporated in her documentation. If so, I appologize for being redundant.

I have a couple of forms that I've created which are checklists for the property owner (could also be used by a contractor for bidding purposes) to use to evaluate the condition of their buildings - basically a "yes or "no" questionnaire. Depending on how the question is posed, it can be determined if the feature needs repair or is okay until next season's maintenance check. This document might be better in an appendix, but at least it could reinforce a repair ethos as opposed to replace.

sschoberg
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Joined: June 9th, 2011, 9:43 pm

Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby sschoberg » August 3rd, 2011, 5:23 pm

Yes I like numbering the windows. We use a little different numbering. We always number from outside beginning with the highest floor first and the first window on the left. We always include which direction the wall is pointing. An example or a typical number pattern we would use is W1, for West #1. When we first began we also labeled the top sash with an A and the bottom sash with a B so a given window would be W1A and W1B.

When removing sashes from the opening on site we carry a marker and as soon as we have the sash removed its number is written on the sides (both sides) of each sash. When the sashes reach receiving at our shop a label is attached to the side of the stile with the corresponding number of the sash. We use a heavy card label with wire already attached to it. We use a screw on the sash stile side and wrap the wire around it. We buy these labels at Staples or one of the other office supply stores. We always include the customers name on these labels along with the date they reach our shop. We also mark if and which glass is missing or cracked.

We number and stamp the number on all new storm windows and also stamp its location on the house. This helps when a painter removes a storm to paint the window to place the correct storm on a given window.

I'm not saying our numbering system is the best one, only that a numbering system is important.

oculus
Posts: 66
Joined: May 18th, 2011, 12:15 am

Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby oculus » August 4th, 2011, 2:44 pm

Thanks Steve. I have worked a lot of years on the assessment form and I am now pretty pleased with it. The repair log and glazing inventory is another matter, I am about to tweek it again.
I agree that a numbering system should be used. When I teach folks here in Oregon about restoration I tell them to pick a numbering system that works for you and be consistent with it. I don't think it matters so much what kind of system you use, just use it consistently and write it down. You never know when someone else will have to try and interpret what you have done.

Hey Kathy, tell me more about the assessment forms you use. Do you find it useful? Easy to use?
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

johnleeke
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Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
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Re: Craft Practice Documentation

Postby johnleeke » October 28th, 2011, 5:08 pm

Here is a basic documentation method for windows:

http://www.cr.nps.gov/tps/standards/app ... tation.htm
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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