Gluing Sash Joints?

Wood repairs for sashes, frames and sills.
johnleeke
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Re: Gluing Sash Joints?

Postby johnleeke » December 24th, 2011, 4:04 pm

>>I will get to them and have some pics before the end of January.<<

OK, that sounds good.
John
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david
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Re: Gluing Sash Joints?

Postby david » January 28th, 2012, 6:41 pm

Hey my apologies for the late input on this topic. A few thoughts on random topics. When it comes to glued joints, I suppose its a mute point to discuss if jointers would have used glues on sashes if something other than hyde glue was available, as it is water soluable. I personally do not believe a joint as small as the m and t on the joints of a window will move that much to cause them to move and split the wood. Think of a lock rail on a door. The lock rail is many times wider than the rails of a sash and the joint is glued. If the lock rail is very wide the tenon is broken up into two sections not a continuous tenon. This is done to allow the wood to move. My previous experience in restoring high end furniture lends several repair techniques to house and other wood repairs in general. I have attached a couple of photos.
Attachments
IMG_4831.JPG
A repair technique I frequently use to repair rotten stile ends. I find I can make this repair faster than epoxy repairs.
IMG_4422.JPG
This is the back of a church pew. The tenon was missing and a new tenon was cut in using the table saw. Note the shape of the new tenon is the arc of the saw blade. It is the same size as the mortise that it fits.

johnleeke
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Re: Gluing Sash Joints?

Postby johnleeke » January 28th, 2012, 9:57 pm

David, I take your point about gluing the sash joints, and it's clear you are gluing the joint with the meeting rails as well as the joint within the stile. That is a fine looking repair. I often glue simpler lap-joints within the stiles, but pin the rail joint, so the joint could be dis-assembled for future repairs.

Would it be possible to make the joint within the stile, just as you have, but somewhat longer and put two or three pins in it with no glue? I suppose the two or three pin holes could lead to eventual deterioration.
John
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johnleeke
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Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
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Re: Gluing Sash Joints?

Postby johnleeke » January 28th, 2012, 10:01 pm

Would you like to submit a step-by-step method for that stile-end repair? If so, here are the guidelines for doing that:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=150
John
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http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

david
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Re: Gluing Sash Joints?

Postby david » January 31st, 2012, 7:38 pm

Thanks John,
That topic of gluing is a funny one. Ill have to try the lap joint and see if that is faster. That photo with the new stile end was cut with a hollow chisel mortiser. The new tenon on the church pew is easily applied to missing tenons on windows, I just forgot to mention that. I don't always glue joints but I find at least down here, that the joints are not that great of a fit to begin with. I do see your point about dismantling joints for future repairs. Doing the "right" thing for history has always been a constant struggle in my mind. I think one thing that pushed me to gluing was a window project where all the windows had just been repaired within the last year and were starting to show signs of movement. The homeowner sued every contractor that stepped foot on the property and won the case. Charleston is a funny city to work in, almost no interest in working on windows. Ill look at the doing the step-by-step.


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