Page 12

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johnleeke
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Page 12

Postby johnleeke » August 2nd, 2011, 5:52 pm

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Patrick
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Re: Page 12

Postby Patrick » August 11th, 2011, 3:09 pm

RE: lead needs to be addressed at each step as we are dealing in many cases HUD stds are central with Fed funded projects

Planning
Standards - Window surveys, what is deteriorated, does there need to be a std for appropriate treatment?

* Lawrence Berkley Study - storm windows measured performance

Need architectural standards that are distillations of best practices

Set a standard for lead remediation & require EPA & HUD stds to follow collaborative stds

comment - Vt Deputy SHPO now HUD preservation officer

jlindtner
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Re: Page 12

Postby jlindtner » August 13th, 2011, 11:58 am

I think lead needs to be addressed in general. To address it at each step of the standards would double the size of the document.

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Re: Page 12

Postby Paul Marlowe » August 14th, 2011, 6:53 pm

@Site Work: RE Lead- Portable air scrubber (PAS) are a good piece of equipment for capturing all dust including lead at the source and creating negative air. The downside is they are expensive depending on the size and they take up room in the vehicle, shop & on site. They were never mentioned in the three classes I took for the RRP training in CT.

@Site Work: Temp. window cover- if using polyethylene (poly) there is a greenhouse grade poly that is a true 6mil, durable and very clear. Watch out for large advertiser's lettering which is on some brands.

@Site Work: Assess conditions- probe type moisture meter is helpful when assessing wood decay.

@Site Work: Sill & frame treatments- properly applied & paint protected, good quality epoxy consolidants & epoxy fillers (patch) have over three decades of proven results.

@Site Work: Sill renewal w new wood- This needs to be done well using a proper choice of decay resistant wood, possible borate preservative & sealing the end grain & butt joints w epoxy or waterproof glue to minimize water intrusion & fungus attack.

Patrick Roach
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Re: Page 12

Postby Patrick Roach » August 16th, 2011, 9:53 am

@Conditions Assessment:

Include investigation of weight pockets and condition of frame, to check for squareness of frame elements and for air infiltration sources or rot within the weight pocket itself. Include initial investigation for air infiltration - perhaps outline a simple field method such as use of a smoke stick or similar approach. Localize and determine the severity of the problem, the contribution of the window to the problem (infiltration may be coming from other sources than the sash) and the appropriate approach to take for weatherization of the existing window.

@Materials and Products:

Wood:
Include specific characteristics or properties to define criteria for lumber selection. Identify species, grain and cut, and grade - these will vary regionally. Since lumber can vary in quality within these requirements identify additional characteristics - i.e., minimum density or some other quality which can be reasonably evaluated and which helps narrow the selection.

Paint:
Include surface preparation requirements, thinning and mixing, and when to use which type of paint (i.e., alkyd, latex, oil, or high-performance). Consider VOC limits for paint applications, in particular for interior applications, as this has an impact on indoor air quality.

Add material requirements related to steel window restoration: Carbon content of steel for replacement materials, welding and brazing requirements and equipment.

Add requirements for hardware, including operating hardware as well as fasteners and pins. Specify manufacturing standards (if there are any), or alloy/material requirements. For example, for stainless steel sash pins, is there a reason why one may want to go to a Type 316 stainless steel, in say, a coastal environment?

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Re: Page 12

Postby Nathalie Wright » August 18th, 2011, 7:47 pm

I wholeheartedly agree with the comments above that lead needs to be addressed within the Standards. Right now, the window replacement industry is aggressively marketing under the energy efficiency umbrella. As word gets out that historic windows with good storms are equivalent to new windows with respect to weatherization, the window replacement industry will then shift gears to lead-based fear marketing.

In my community, every neighborhood has at least one nonprofit or church (sometimes more than one in the same neighborhood) receiving funds to complete house rehabs for low income residents. They always tear out the windows. Energy efficiency is the first consideration for replacement windows, but the deal is sealed over the presence of lead paint.

I’m not advocating for a regurgitation of the RRP Rule. Readers can be directed to the EPA for that. However, if the Collaborative is to gain better footing and convince homeowners, policy makers, and non-preservation nonprofits that window repair is the better choice, lead has to be addressed in a meaningful way within the Standards.

sschoberg
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Re: Page 12

Postby sschoberg » August 18th, 2011, 9:58 pm

It depends on how you interject RRP, but I would think this needs to be left to EPA approved classes. Other than filling in some gaps--such as what type of Hepa vacuum is seeminly best. Or as Paul M stated about the type of 6 mil plastic he likes. I doubt EPA is going to allow any collaboration to dictate how to address RRP for our industry.
We all know its important and we all (by now) are certified contractors. Or I would sure hope so!!

Steve S
Schoberg Restoraitons Inc

barnlover
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Re: Page 12

Postby barnlover » August 24th, 2011, 1:36 am

Working on-site with windows or not usually the biggest issue because temporary "windows" are not attractive, can't see out well or at all, not egress. Short term solid wood panes are typically used when sashes are removed to go off site. Best to have an exterior storm window installed until prime window can be reinstalled. Not easily accessible windows could have a plexiglass or other acrylic installed with out without a frame that can be attached directly. In the end, a decision has to be made as to how secure a window opening or house is.

Does anyone still use a heat plate to remove paint anymore? can leave scorch marks and potential for live sparks in wall cavities that can ignite at any time.

Hot air gun can be a glorified hair dryer is only as good as the person using it. Now air guns are sold in big box stores so anyone can buy one. Remember to include the need to shield the glass with aluminum foil or scrap sheet metal and wear goggles and a respirator with high temperatures.

How widely used is steam box or portable steam used?

barnlover
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Re: Page 12

Postby barnlover » August 24th, 2011, 1:46 am

I haven't used the IR paint remover personally but my understanding is that it is best used on flat surfaces. They seem to work pretty slick but they are pretty heavy in the long term hence why they have come up with arms and bar attachments. Some people are making their own versions since this is a fairly expensive tool with all the attachments and scrapers.

sschoberg
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Re: Page 12

Postby sschoberg » August 28th, 2011, 4:42 pm

We use heat guns---exclusively, but let me tell you---they are dangerous. If you don't know at what temp you heat gun operates at and don't know at what point your particular heat gun will begin burning old wood or don't know how the structure is put together,that your heating up then you have no business using one. So goes with Infra Red. If you send someone out with either and say use these to remove the paint on this house, chance are very good your gonna burn it.

I don't think the collaborative should be telling anyone to use this method or that. I don't think we need to mention any kind of removal method.

I think we should only be promoting our industry and not any other item or product, generally or specifically.

Steve S
Schoberg Restorations Inc


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