Window Cleaning (final)

Ongoing maintenance treatments.
johnleeke
Posts: 374
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Window Cleaning (final)

Postby johnleeke » December 6th, 2012, 5:52 pm

WPSC Window Standard Treatment Form
Number:
Status: [ ] submitted treatment standard, [ ] proposed treatment standard, [x] final treatment standard
Update: 12/8/2012
Author: Doug Johnson
References:
Contributors:

Title of Treatment: Window Cleaning
Class of Treatment: [X] Maintain, [ ] Stabilize, [ ] Repair, [ ] Upgrade, [ ] Exception
Type of Treatment: [ ] Traditional, [X] Contemporary

Condition to be Treated: Glass panes have an accumulation of common dirt on the surfaces that may include dust, grit, paint specs, flies specs and bird droppings.

Description: Cleaning the glass panes of putty glazed windows requires special methods and materials to keep from damaging the putty and paint that seals onto the glass. Cleaning should be done regularly, perhaps once or twice a year. Regular cleaning reduces damage to the window because it prevents heavy dirt buildup that may require more aggressive cleaning methods. Cleaning of common soiling and dirt includes removal of cobwebs, road dust, grit, occasional paint specs, flies specs and bird droppings. Cleaning begins with gentle methods and materials, then, only if necessary, proceeds cautiously with more aggressive cleaning methods. New putty and paint should be fully cured for 9 to 12 months before window cleaning.

Typical Procedure:
1. Brush away any loose debris, dust and grit with a soft bristle brush.
2. Lightly wet the glass with a mixture of mild detergent and water. Mix 1/10, of a fluid ounce (3 mL) to a gallon of water. "Less is more" in that the less material applied to the glass, the less needs to be removed or is likely to leave a residue.
3. Wipe the pane with a rubber-bladed squeegee from one edge to another with successive swipes, moving down the pane till the entire pane has been wiped free of water. After each swipe wipe off the blade.
4. Finish detailing with a soft absorbent towel wiping and absorbing leftover water on the edge of glass and muntin.
5. If there are paint specs, fly specs or bird droppings remaining on the glass, wet the glass again and carefully use a narrow (1.5”), new, clean razor blade with the edge pressed flat to the glass surface and scrape in a forward direction only. Lift the blade to draw it back and then place the edge of the blade on the glass and forward scrape again.
6. Repeat steps 1 – 3.
7. Occasionally a white non-abrasive scrubbing pad may be used to good effect to remove some stubborn common spots and stains.

Materials:
• Window washing T-mop
• Rubber-bladed squeegee
• Mild detergent & water
• Common 1.5” razor blades
• White scrubbing pad (melamine foam, preferably with no additives)
• Absorbent cotton towel


Quality of Results:

Results are best judged at arms length, with the naked eye in ordinary daylight.

Best Work: Glass is clean and free of all dirt, specs, spots and stains, corner to corner, edge to edge.

Adequate Work: Glass is clean with an occasional tiny spot of paint barely visible to the eye.

Inadequate Work: Residue of dirt, detergent and water remains on the glass, often most noticeable at the edges and corners due to inadequate detailing. Glass is scratched due to rough use of blade or a defective blade that is rusty, dull or misshapen. Gouges to putty and paint where it meets the glass to form a water proof seal do to careless use of razor.

Grandviewguy
Posts: 1
Joined: December 7th, 2012, 10:28 am
Full Name: Doug Johnson
Location: Portland, Maine
Organization: Grandview Window
Permissions: Yes

Re: Basic Maintenance Window Cleaning

Postby Grandviewguy » December 7th, 2012, 11:12 am

Here is Doug's original work method submission:

WPSC Window Standard Work Method Form
Number:
Status: [ ] submitted treatment standard, [ ] proposed treatment standard, [ ] final treatment standard
Update:
Author: Doug Johnson
References:
Contributors:

Title of Treatment: Glass Cleaning
Class of Treatment: [X ] Maintain, [ ] Stabilize, [ ] Repair, [ ] Upgrade, [ ] Exception
Type of Treatment: [ ] Traditional, [X] Contemporary


Condition to be Treated: Regular maintenance cleaning of historic or period glass.

Description: Cleaning of common dirt including removal occasional paint specs, flies specs and bird droppings begins with the most minimally invasive application then, if necessary proceeding cautiously with more aggressive cleaning methods. I have been repairing and cleaning historic windows for 37 years. Working full time as a window cleaner for the past seven years.

Typical Procedure:
1. If glass and muntins are heavily soiled brush away loose dust with a soft bristle brush.
2. Lightly wet the glass with a mixture of mild detergent and water. I use 1/10, (3 mL) of an ounce to a gallon of water. Less is more in that the least material applied to the glass, the less to be removed or likely to leave a residue.
3. Wipe the pane with a rubber squeegee from one edge to another with successive swipes, moving down the pane till the entire pane has been wiped free of water.
4. Finish detail with a soft absorbent towel wiping and absorbing leftover water on the edge of glass and muntin.
5. If light paint spots, fly specs or bird droppings remain on the glass wet the glass again and carefully use a narrow (1.5”) new, clean razor blade pressed flat to the glass surface and scrape wet glass in one direction only.
6. Repeat steps 1 – 3.
7. Occasionally a white non abrasive scrubbing pad may be used to good effect to remove some stubborn common spots and stains.

Materials:
• Window washing T-mop
• Rubber squeegee
• Mild detergent & water
• Common 1.5” razor blade.
• White scrubbing pad
• Absorbent cotton towel.


Quality of Results: <Describe how the quality of the completed work can be judged.>

Best Work: Glass is clean and free of all dirt, spots and stains, corner to corner, edge to edge.

Adequate Work: Glass is clean with an occasional tiny spot of paint barely visible to the eye.

Inadequate Work: Residue of dirt, detergent and water remains on the glass often most noticeable at the edges and corners due to inadequate detailing. Glass is scratched due to rough use of blade or a defective blade that is rusty, dull or misshapen. Gouges to putty and paint where it meets the glass to form a water proof seal do to careless use of razor.

johnleeke
Posts: 374
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Window Cleaning (draft)

Postby johnleeke » December 8th, 2012, 12:53 pm

Doug, welcome to the Standards project and thank you for submitting this work method on window cleaning.

I've bumped your submission up to standard draft status and posted it at the top of this discussion. I've given it a light edit and added a few clarifications. Please review it and comment if you think any changes are needed.

Do you mind talking about the specific products and materials you use? Here are a few questions:

What products do you use in your cleaning solution? I want to be sure the generic descriptions in the materials listing are as accurate and definitive as possible. (here at the Forum we can name specific products, but only the generic descriptions will appear in the final standards publication.

Also, what white scrubbing pad product do you use? I suspect this is the melamine foam type, but I want to make sure. Some of the melamine foam scrubbing pads have additional materials in them, like mineral spirits, detergents, etc., so I'd like to sort that out.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
Posts: 374
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Window Cleaning (draft)

Postby johnleeke » May 15th, 2013, 12:34 pm

I suggest that new putty and paint should be fully cured for 9 to 12 months before cleaning.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


Return to “Maintenance”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest