Using and Reading the Standards (final)

Mission Statement, Goals & Objectives, Purpose and Acceptance, How to Use the Standards, History of the Standards
johnleeke
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Using and Reading the Standards (final)

Postby johnleeke » November 18th, 2011, 3:52 pm

(update: 3/7/13, finalized; 12/21/12, final edits on permissions; 12/10/12, new section on Referencing the Standards; 3/16/12, added a new section on Reading the Standards)

Using the Standards

Author: John Leeke
Contributors: Steve Schoberg, Patrick Roach, Bob Yapp

Architects can reference the Standards in a way that helps achieve the goals of their project and controls the work while underway. They can serve as an aid to determine appropriate treatments and to provide criteria for a testing and inspection regimen on individual projects.

Window specialists, tradespeople and contractors experienced in window preservation work can use the Standards to help guide the development of their own knowledge and skills. Tradespeople not experienced in window preservation work can use the Standards to begin learning window preservation work. Contractors just getting into window preservation may find them especially useful as part of their employee training program to help bring their workers up to speed quickly.

Building owners and contractors can use the standards to document recommended and selected treatments, demonstrating due diligence by the contractor and acceptability by the customer. The project documentation and the Standards can follow the ownership of the building so when a new owner finds a less than ultimate window repair, they will be able to see in the documentation that the repair is the one that was chosen and thoughtfully justified at the time. This may help save a reputation of a particular contractor and also shows the new building owner and future contractors what was done and for what reason.

Businesses can make the Standards a part of their marketing program to attract interest in their work, for example by stating that they do work that meets the National Window Preservation Standards. The Standards can be used in marketing to make it clear to potential customers that a business is different from others that do not follow the Standards.

Educators can use the Standards as part of their preservation trades training programs, to guide the development of their students knowledge of the general principles and the specific methods of window preservation.

Building owners can use the Standards to help direct their maintenance staffs in effective window maintenance and repairs.

Preservation commissions can use the Standards to educate their constituents and demonstrate that window preservation is indeed possible, and to document justifications for their decisions and actions. Commissions with an education initiative can keep multiple copies on hand for lending out.

Homeowners can use the Standards to guide their own do-it-yourself work and to judge the character and quality of the work done on their windows by others.

Reading the Standards

Each individual treatment standard has these topics:

Reference:
Identifies sources that were used to develop the standard, or where further detailed information can be found in recognized publications and on the internet.

Author, Contributors:
The principle writer of the standard, and those who assisted in the development or writing of it. Most standards are authored by a practicing tradesperson who has decades of experience and who has done the treatment hundreds of times.

Description:
A brief write-up on the standard using common English language without jargon along with special considerations, such as when it is appropriate to use, or not use, the standard.

Typical Procedure:
The series of steps taken to accomplished the desired result of the method, including what needs to be done, but not necessarily how to do it. The purpose is to have enough information about the procedure so that a person who is not trained in the method could recognize whether or not the procedure is being followed by the tradesperson.

Materials:
A listing of the basic materials and types of products used in the treatment. Only generic descriptions of manufactured products are included. Specific product names or brands are not included to assure the Standards are objective and without conflict of interest.

Quality of Results:
Here are statements and simple tests that can be used to judge the character and quality of the completed work.
"Best Work" is the highest quality that can be achieved by workers with decades of experience, and is the ultimate goal of all window preservation work.
"Adequate Work" describes the results of less experienced workers that are reasonably sufficient to achieve an acceptable level of quality. "Adequate Work" assumes the worker is always striving to do better work and is actually achieving better results each time a treatment is done. "Adequate Work" results that are the same time after time are not acceptable and do not meet the standard. "Inadequate Work" is a result that indicates the work does not meet the standard and that the work must be redone to achieve an acceptable level of quality. "Inadequate Work" may not be left standing as the final result.


Referencing the Window Standards

Reference Format to cite the entire set of Standards:

Organization Designation / Title / Edition and Version / Publisher / Publication Year / Publisher Website

Example:

WPSC, "National Window Preservation Standards," 1st Edition Ver. 1.0, WPSC Window Preservation Standards Collaborative, 2013, http://www.WindowStandards.org

Reference Format to cite an individual treatment Standard:

Organization Designation / "Title" / Edition and Version / Treatment Title / Treatment Classification / Treatment Type / Publisher / Publication Year / Publisher Website

Example:

WPSC, "National Window Preservation Standards," 1st Edition Ver. 1.0, Glaze Wood Sash, Repair, Contemporary, WPSC Window Preservation Standards Collaborative, 2012, http://www.WindowStandards.org

Fair Use of the Standards

These Standards are copyrighted by the WPSC. The fair and reasonable use of the Standards includes:

Professional Specifications, Scopes of Work, Work Write-Ups, Reports:
The Standards may be referenced as indicated above. A published printed copy of the Standards may purchased and included with each copy of your specification or report, or readers of the specification or report may purchase a copy of the Standards. Small or large excerpts may NOT be reproduced in any form for any purpose. Copyrights to all of the Standards are held by the WPSC. Copyrights of some parts of the standards are held by others and reproduced here with specific permissions that do not include passing along rights to others.

Individuals:
Any person may purchase a copy of the Standards and use it for their own reference or study. If a friend or colleague wants photocopies or scans, please ask them to obtain their own copy.

Educational Programs:
Institutions may purchase single or multiple copies for their libraries, sell copies in their bookstores or require students to purchase copies. Single or multiple pages may not be photocopied and handed out or compiled into other documents without explicit written permission from the business director of the WPSC.

sschoberg
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Re: How to Use the Standards

Postby sschoberg » March 4th, 2012, 2:44 pm

All of the above and their all good. The standards will help to make restoration of original windows a viable option. It and education tool in itself. Heck most homeowners still do not know that the repair and restoration of their original windows is even possible.

There also needs to be a clear and precise reason stated in the standards for preserving, and repairing original windows. Those reasons should not depend on the cost competitiveness of restoring versus replacement or the fact that a restored window can compare to the energy efficiency of a replacement window.

Cost of restoration varies with regions and conditions of the windows and in some circumstances they may be competitive with replacing, but this should not be allowed to be part of the argument to keep and repair original windows.

and the same for comaring the energy efficiencies of each. It should not be allowed to part the main thrust of persuading a homewowner to restore rather than replace. If it is then sometimes we will lose. I do not want to be on the same level as replacement windows. Its a losing battle. The comparison test performed in Kentucky will show (if we ever see it) that original windows do a very good job at keeping the cold and winds from coming into the dwelling. The fact that an original window will beat a new window or be equal to it in energy efficiency is not the argument I want to use to a homeowner. Sure I will make it a matter of fact in the list of reasons (probably towards the bottom of the list) for keeping the originals but I will never use it as my main stay argument.

johnleeke
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Re: How to Use the Standards

Postby johnleeke » March 4th, 2012, 4:25 pm

Steve:

>>There also needs to be a clear and precise reason stated in the standards for preserving, and repairing original windows. <<

I think the place for that is the very first topic of the Introduction:
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=159

So, you would use the Standards for marketing your services. That's good.

What are the reasons your customers decide to have their windows preserved and repaired? I'll put your reasons in this topic and then see how I can fit them into some of the other introductory sections right up front.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
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Re: How to Use the Standards

Postby johnleeke » March 9th, 2012, 2:11 pm

Steve Schoberg writes:

>>Having the chosen repair documented as well as the recommended repair, demonstrated due diligence by the restorer and acceptability by the customer. Documentation follows ownership of the home or building so when home's new owner sees a less than ultimate window repair, they will be able to see in the documentation that the repair is the one that was chosen at the time. May help save a reputation of a particular restorer and also shows the new homeowner and any new restorer what was done and for what reason.<<

I have included this thought in the rough draft above.

Let me know if that's OK.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
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Re: How to Use the Standards (rouhg draft)

Postby johnleeke » March 16th, 2012, 10:39 am

Patrick Roach writes:
>>The test data can serve not only to help sell window restoration, but also to determine appropriate treatments, and if necessary, to provide the performance criteria for a testing and inspection regimen on an individual project.<<

and I have incorporated that into the paragraph on how architects can use the Standards, see above.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

sschoberg
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Joined: June 9th, 2011, 9:43 pm

Re: Using and Reading the Standards (rough draft)

Postby sschoberg » March 18th, 2012, 3:12 pm

My customers expect as a result of my restorations of their sashes

that they will have eye appeal and look good. In reality they are usually very shocked when I installed their restored sasehs because they were not expecting their old sashes to look as good a they do.

that they are functional----and they're always surprised that their windows function so well after we've installed them. Some are truly surprised with the ease at which they can raise and lower the sashes.

That they are reasonably energy efficient. They do not want to feel a draft coming from their restored windows--- But there has never been a question about whether their restored sashes will be equal to the energy efficiency of new type windows.

that they're restored windows will give them maintenance and trouble free use-----even if not asked this directly, we assume information regarding this is needed.

johnleeke
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Re: Using and Reading the Standards (rough draft)

Postby johnleeke » March 18th, 2012, 5:53 pm

Appearance

Function

Efficiency

Durability

All attributes of best work.

I like this.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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