Classes & Types of Treatments (final)

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johnleeke
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Classes & Types of Treatments (final)

Postby johnleeke » November 18th, 2011, 4:03 pm

(Update: 3/4/13)

Class of Treatments
The Secretary of the Interior Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties has four overall approaches for the treatment of historic buildings: Preserve, Rehabilitate, Restore and Reconstruct. The five tactics identified in the Secretary's Treatments to Preserve are: Identify, Stabilize, Protect, Repair and Replace in Kind. Out of these Secretary of the Interior Standards these three classes of window work are derived:

· Stabilize, preliminary temporary measures that do not prevent future effective treatments. Typically includes “L” plates on weak sash joints, tape or sealants on open wood or glass joints, etc.

· Maintain, routine treatments to clean and protect. Typically includes glass cleaning, painted surface cleaning, spot paint maintenance, spot putty maintenance, lubricating moving parts, etc.

· Repair, fixing individual parts or systems. Typically includes rebuilding a rotten sash joint, replacing a broken piece of glass, includes part-by-part renewal, etc.

with two more added for these Standards:

· Upgrade, improve the performance, in durability or energy use. Typically includes applying a preservative to prevent wood decay, or installing weatherstripping to reduce energy use, etc.

· Exception, anything that does not fit into an existing standard. This allows for innovations and types of work that exceed the existing standards, specifically to allow for the continuing refinement of one of the most highly effective building systems that has been developing over the past four centuries. If the exception classification is used, the excepted method must be documented on the standard method submissions form, made a part of the project's documentation and submitted to the WPSC website for future review of its performance and possible inclusion in the Standards. (See the Appendix for the form and instructions.)

Each of the individual treatments described in these Standards will fit into one of these classes and is "earmarked" to show which class it is.

Types of Treatments

· Contemporary, developed or commonly used after 1940. For example: wood-epoxy repairs, stainless steel fasteners, acrylic paints.

· Traditional, in common use during all pre-1940 eras. For example: spot paint maintenance, wood dutchmen, part-by-part renewal.

· Conservation, places the highest premium on keeping original material. For example: keeping all paint in good condition, continuing to use all parts in good condition, repairing the cracked corner of a glass pane instead of replacing the whole pane. Guidelines for conservation include: Cultural value of the window is formally identified and recognized. Retaining of all original or significant material and not adversely affecting it. Reversibility of treatments, so the object could be returned to it's pretreatment state or condition. Documentation of the examination, investigation, and treatment of the window with permanent written records and reports. Following formal guidelines for conservation practice and a code of ethics, such as those developed by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works.

Each of the individual treatments described in these Standards will fit into one of these types and is "earmarked" to show which type it is.

(Click on "Post Reply" above to comment.)

jlindtner
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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby jlindtner » January 9th, 2012, 11:48 pm

Perhaps include examples:

Conservative: Preserve what is left and take a minimalistic approach.

Traditional: Dutchmen repairs.

Contemporary: Use of epoxies...

johnleeke
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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby johnleeke » March 3rd, 2012, 3:09 pm

John, thanks for your comments. I have included your examples in this topic.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

Bob Yapp
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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby Bob Yapp » August 22nd, 2012, 11:25 am

Not sure I agree with the Conservation including cracked glass. Cracked glass is a safety hazard as well as allowing moisture penetration. Most if not all museum properties I've worked with would only repair a small corner break etc.

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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby johnleeke » August 22nd, 2012, 2:20 pm

Bob, I agree with you, leaving cracked glass would be a safety hazard. The example above is "repairing cracked glass" making it safe. Cracks across the corners are the most common repair, I've done it many times myself. While we don't yet have a standard on repairing glass, I think we can let the example of "repairing cracked glass" stand here. It's just an example, and not pretending to get into all the ins and outs of repairing cracked glass, when it's appropriate, etc.

As you say, cracked corners are often repaired, and I have also seen larger panes of etched or textured glass that were cracked right across the middle repaired instead of replaced, because good replacements could not be found, and there was a high value on keeping the authentic original glass in place.

Here at the front of the Standards I want to keep the possibilities wide open. Later, when someone submits a standard on repairing cracked glass, the details of when it's appropriate can be covered.

Maybe Amy will chime in here, she's our adviser on conservation issues.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

oculus
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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby oculus » September 14th, 2012, 1:05 am

Sorry this has taken so long to get here. Schedule is a bit hectic right now.

So with regards to the cracked glass question I would say that each project is different and one blanket statement about whether or not a piece of cracked glass is repairable or should be replaced is unadvisable. I've had conservation projects where cracked panes were replaced but had others where the glass was so historic, not made anymore or had a signature scratched into it that I glued back together. The decision is not wholly mine to make either, usually there are the owners of the structure, the state historic preservation officer, and a preservation architect. All of these parties come together and make all decisions regarding the conservation plan.


Conservation requires the highest possible standards and includes examination, documentation, appropriate treatment and education. Professionals embarking on window conservation work require specialized training and practice careful examination and research on all aspects of historic window construction and repair techniques. Adherence to a professional conservation organization’s code of ethics is advisable, such as the American Institute of Conservators.
Here is the website and code of ethics
http://www.conservation-us.org/index.cf ... 8&nodeID=1

Most projects don't fall into the category of conservation. This treatment would be applied to structures that are irreplaceable and invaluable on a state and federal level.
Amy Harrington McAuley
Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc.
http://oculuswindow.blogspot.com/
oculuswindow@gmail.com

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"-T.Edison

johnleeke
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Re: Classes & Types of Treatments (draft)

Postby johnleeke » September 17th, 2012, 6:14 pm

OK, here are a few things that seem to make Conservation, different from the Traditional and Contemporary types of treatments:

--Cultural value of the window is formally identified and recognized

--Retaining of all original or significant material and not adversely affecting it

--Reversibility of treatments, so the object could be returned to it's pretreatment state or condition

--Documentation of the examination, investigation, and treatment of the window with permanent written records and reports

--Following formal guidelines for conservation practice and a code of ethics, such as those developed by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works (AIC)
Reference: http://www.conservation-us.org

If there is any further discussion, please go ahead; otherwise I'll include these five points in the definition of our Conservation Type of treatment.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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