Safety Statement (final)

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Bob Yapp
Posts: 59
Joined: May 9th, 2011, 8:39 am

Safety Statement (final)

Postby Bob Yapp » February 14th, 2012, 7:21 pm

Safety Statement

All of the topics and methods described in these standards assume that safe methods will be used. The individual topics and methods do not specifically cover important safety issues and procedures that must be added by the people managing the window project and the people doing the window work.

Everyone involved in this window work must have safety as a primary objective and provide for that safety during all window work.

They need to follow all local, state and federal laws, requirements and recommendations for the safety of the workers in the shop and on the job site as well as provide for the safety of the building occupants, passers-by and others. Workers need to know and use all product, tool and equipment manufacturers' safety warnings and recommendations.

While unstable lead-containing paint can be a hazard to human health, old and historic windows do not need to be discarded just because of the presence of lead-containing paint. Older and historic windows can be preserved in a lead-safe way with the effective attention of a properly trained professional or property owner. Any contractor bidding window preservation work on structures built before 1978 must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency as a Certified Renovator in compliance with the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP). Property owners doing their own work, may or may not be required to be registered as an RRP contractor.

For more information:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.epa.gov/lead/

Lead Paint and Historic Buildings
A publication for historic property owners, contractors, and preservationists on lead-safe methods and techniques to rehab their properties.
http://www.illinoishistory.gov/PS/leadpaint.htm

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Safety Statement-Draft

Postby johnleeke » February 25th, 2012, 5:36 pm

Bob's original submission:

Safety Statement: Shop & Worksite Safety

While the primary purpose of these Window Preservation Standards is to set a quality standard for the repair, restoration and weatherization of historic wood and steel casement windows, safety is and should be a primary goal for everyone involved in any of these pursuits.

Anyone involved in the preservation of old and/or historic windows should follow all local, state and federal laws, requirements and recommendations for the safety of the workers in the shop or on the job site as well as the safety of the people who use and occupy the structures involved in the work. Workers should also familiarize themselves with all product manufacturers safety warnings and recommendations.

While unstable lead paint is a hazard to human health, lead paint is not a reason to discard old and historic windows. All old and historic windows can be made lead safe or lead free by a properly trained professional or property owner. Any contractor bidding window preservation work on structures built before 1978 must be registered by the Environmental Protection Agency as a Certified Renovator in compliance with the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP). Property owners doing their own work, who may not be required to be registered as an RRP contractor, should go to http://www.epa.gov/lead/ to educate themselves in all the safe ways to manage lead paint.

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Safety Statement (draft)

Postby johnleeke » February 25th, 2012, 6:07 pm

I've given this a very heavy edit.

We want to make just a few essential statements to begin raising awareness in the reader if the primary safety issues, without saying so much that we expose ourselves to unnecessary liability. Even what I've left in the third paragraph about who needs to be registered might be too detailed.

One of the reasons for limiting the details is that they may change, and then what we have published is out of date.

OK, let me know what you think.

Are there any other safety resources we can refer to?
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

Bob Yapp
Posts: 59
Joined: May 9th, 2011, 8:39 am

Re: Safety Statement (draft)

Postby Bob Yapp » August 22nd, 2012, 11:43 am

I made a couple of small changes:

Safety Statement

All of the topics and methods described in these standards assume that safe work methods will be used. The individual topics and methods do not specifically cover important safety issues and procedures that must be added by the people managing the window project and the people doing the window work.

Everyone involved in this window work must have safety as a primary objective and provide for that safety during all window work.

They need to follow all local, state and federal laws, requirements and recommendations for the safety of the workers in the shop and on the job site as well as provide for the safety of the building occupants, passers-by and others. Workers need to know and use all product, tool and equipment manufacturers' safety warnings and recommendations.

While unstable lead-containing paint is a hazard to human health, old and historic windows do not need to be discarded because of the presence of lead-containing paint. Older and historic windows can be preserved in a lead-safe way with the effective attention of a properly trained professional or property owner. As of this printing, any contractor bidding window preservation work on structures built before 1978 must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency as a Certified Renovator in compliance with the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP). Property owners doing their own work, may or may not be required to be registered as an RRP contractor.


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