Fill Minor Voids in Wood Surfaces (final)

Wood repairs for sashes, frames and sills.
Bob Yapp
Posts: 59
Joined: May 9th, 2011, 8:39 am

Fill Minor Voids in Wood Surfaces (final)

Postby Bob Yapp » February 29th, 2012, 3:14 pm

Author: Bob Yapp
Contributor: John Leeke

Title of Treatment: Fill Minor Voids in Wood Surfaces
Class of Treatment: [ ] Maintain, [ ] Stabilize, [x] Repair, [ ] Upgrade, [ ] Exception
Type of Treatment: [x] Traditional, [ ] Modern

Condition to be Treated:
Small voids in wooden surfaces that look unsightly and may allow moisture to penetrate.

Description:
When a sash, sill or jamb is stripped to bare wood small voids need to be filled so there is a continuous surface for paint or clear finish coatings. The voids may be caused by sash pin or peg holes at the mortise and tenon joints, nail holes from hardware or minor checking (splits or gaps aligned with the direction of the grain). A soft filler contracts and expands with the wood as moisture content of the wood changes increasing the service life of this treatment; hard filler tends to loosen and work out of these minor voids reducing the service life. Glazing putty is the traditional filler.

Typical Procedure:
1. Examine the bare wood surfaces for minor voids.
2. Prime bare wood to be painted before filling. If the interior side of the sash or jamb will have a clear finish, apply any needed stain and sealer first.
3. Fill the voids with glazing putty for painted surfaces, or with a colored cream putty for interior surfaces. Use a small putty knife to completely fill the void and tool it flush to the surface of the wood.
4. Wipe any putty residue off of the surface around the filled void.
5. Apply top coats of paint or clear finish, which will seal over the putty in the voids.

Materials:
• Glazing putty or soft colored cream putty
• Exterior primer
• Stain and clear sealer

Quality of Results:

Best Work: Filled voids are not noticed once final finishes are applied.
Filled voids can only be seen when viewed closer that six inches from the surface. The voids were filled completely and do not sink below or rise above the finished surface. If colored cream putty was used, the filler can only be seen from six inches away from the finished surface and there is no putty residue on the surface around the filled void.
Adequate Work: Filled voids can only be seen when viewed closer that three feet from the surface. The voids were filled completely but may sink slightly above the finished surface but doesn't rise above it. If colored cream putty was used, there is no putty residue on the surface around the filled void.
Inadequate Work: Filled voids can be seen from more than three feet away. The voids were not filled completely and sink well below the finished surface or rises above it significantly. Putty residue was not removed from the areas around the filled void.

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Filling Minor Voids in Sills, Stiles, Rails & Jambs

Postby johnleeke » March 2nd, 2012, 5:10 pm

Light edits, plus I added a couple of ideas on why this treatment is necessary and how it works, so I gave myself credit as a contributor.

I think this one is ready to go.
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

Bob Yapp
Posts: 59
Joined: May 9th, 2011, 8:39 am

Re: Filling Minor Voids in Wood Surfaces (draft)

Postby Bob Yapp » March 2nd, 2012, 5:22 pm

Nice collaboration there Johnboy! Good to go.


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