Glaze and Paint Sash, Alt.B contemporary (final)

Bob Yapp
Posts: 59
Joined: May 9th, 2011, 8:39 am

Glaze and Paint Sash, Alt.B contemporary (final)

Postby Bob Yapp » March 8th, 2012, 7:05 pm

Number:
Status: [ ] submitted work method, [x] proposed treatment standard, [ ] final treatment standard
Update: 3/12/12
Author: David Gibney
References:
Contributors:

Title of Treatment: Glaze and Paint Sash, Alt.B contemporary
Class of Treatment: [] Maintain, [ ] Stabilize, [x] Repair, [ ] Upgrade, [ ] Exception
Type of Treatment: [ ] Traditional, [x] Contemporary, [ ] Conservation

Condition to be Treated:
Sash needs to be painted after total paint removal and repairs have been completed.

Description:
Paint the sash with a pre-treatment and four coats. The right surface preparation prior to finish painting is essential, without it, the final top coats of paint will fail. This painting treatment is appropriate after all the surface preparation work is completed.

Typical Procedure:

1. Clean off dust with a tack cloth and spot prime any exposed epoxy materials with a shellac-based primer for best adhesion to epoxy surfaces.

2. Coat the entire sash with a mixture of 60% paint thinner and 40% boiled Linseed oil. Allow to dry for 48 hours.

3. Completely coat the sash with a high grade oil based primer, thinned 10% with a paint thinner to allow deep penetration into the wood fibers creating a firm bond to the substrate. Allow primer to cure.

4. Sand the entire sash smooth and touch up minor flaws in the surface.

5. Apply a thin second coat of primer. Allow primer to cure. Sand with 100 grit sandpaper to smooth.

6. Apply one top-coat of paint to the interior and exterior surfaces of the sash.

7. Set the glass panes and glaze in. Allow putty or glazing compound to skin over.

8. Apply the second top coat on the interior and exterior surfaces of the sash and surfaces of the putty, lapping onto the glass at least 1/16".

9. Apply a third topcoat on the bottom edge of the bottom rail of the lower sash were it is susceptible to penetration of water from the sill.

10. After both sash have been installed, touch up paint as necessary.

11. Scrape and clean the glass.

Materials:
•Sandpaper, 100 grit
•Mineral spirits (not "paint thinner" that contains water)
•boiled linseed oil
•Primer: oil-base
•Top-coat paint: waterborne acrylic, or oil-base

Quality of Results

Best Work: All surfaces appear and feel smooth. Paint creates a seal that protects the wood and putty, especially where the glazing compound meets the glass so that moisture cannot penetrate into the glazing compound.

Adequate Work: Paint creates a seal to stop water infiltration.

Inadequate Work: Sash has a rough finish, paint appears not to cover the sash uniformly. Gaps at joints can let in water.

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Paint Sash (draft)

Postby johnleeke » March 12th, 2012, 11:20 am

>>It is successful because the right prep prior to finish painting is essential, without it, the final top coats of paint will fail.<<

If preparation is necessary for success, then we have to include the preparation here. David, what preparation is needed? (step-by-step )

Should steps 4 & 5 include cleaning off the dust from sanding?

In steps 7. and 8. I have added skinning over of putty and lapping paint onto the glass. Is this OK?
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
Location: Portland
Organization: Historic HomeWorks
Permissions: Yes
Location: Portland, Maine
Contact:

Re: Paint Sash (draft)

Postby johnleeke » March 12th, 2012, 11:25 am

Here is David's original submission, for reference:


Number: <you can leave the number blank>
Status: [ ] submitted work method, [ ] proposed treatment standard, [ ] final treatment standard
Update:
Author: David Gibney
References:
Contributors:

Title of Treatment: Paint Sash
Class of Treatment: [x] Maintain, [x ] Stabilize, [ ] Repair, [x ] Upgrade, [ ] Exception
Type of Treatment: [x ] Traditional, [ ] Contemporary, [x ] Conservation

Condition to be Treated:
<State what is wrong with the window that requires treatment. For example, "Paint is peeling at the sash joint." Or, "A pane of glass is cracked."
Sash needs to be paint after total paint removal and repairs have been completed.
Description:
<Include when this treatment is appropriate, how long you have been using this method, how long it holds up, why it is successful, how it fails, etc.>
This treatment is appropriate after all the prep work is completed. I have used this method for the past 25 years without failure. It is successful because the right prep prior to finish painting is essential, without it the final top coats of paint will fail.
<Write each step with a short phrase or single sentence. Simply state what is done, you do not need to include all the details of how to do it.>
1. I first spot prime any exposed epoxy filler with a primer that sticks to any surface, such as Zinzer Bullseye shellac based primer, the reason for this is that regular primers will not stick to epoxy fillers, they fail.
2. I then coat the entire sash with a coat of 60% paint thinner and 40% boiled Linseed oil, let dry for 48 hours. This treatment has raised some controversy as it can cause mildew and mold to form.
For the past twenty five years of using this treatment I have not experienced this problem. The reason I do this is that if the original sash is gray in color and dry, the oil helps rejuvenate the wood fibers so the dry wood will not suck the binders out of the new oil base primer causing failure within the first year.
3. I then completely coat the sash with a high grade oil based primer, thinned 10% with a paint thinner to allow deep penetration into the wood fibers creating a firm bond to the substrate.
4. I then sand the entire sash smooth, touch up minor flaws that always show up after the first coat of primer.
5. I apply a thin second coat of primer, sand smooth ready for finish coat.
6. I then apply one top finish coat, high grade latex acrylic, or high grade European oil base paint to the interior and exterior sides of the sash.
7. After the glass has been installed and the glazing has been completed and dried, I apply the second top coat on the interior and exterior of the sash.
8. After the sash has been installed, I install a third coat of paint on the bottom rail of the lower sash were is susceptible to water penetration sitting on the window sill for extra protection.
9. After both sash have been installed I touch up as necessary to the interior and exterior of the sash, Scrape and clean the glass 100%
10.

Materials:
•Paint thinner boiled linseed oil
• High grade oil base primer
• High grade top coat paint, Latex acrylic or Oil



Quality of Results
<Describe how the quality of the completed work can be judged.>

Best Work: Sash looks like new, smooth paint finish, paint is applied so it creates a seal on the exterior of the glass so that moisture cannot penetrate into the glazing

Adequate Work: Sash has been painted enough to stop water infiltration

Inadequate Work: Sash has a rough finish, paint appears not to cover uniformly the sash substrate


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