Definitions (final)

Mission Statement, Goals & Objectives, Purpose and Acceptance, How to Use the Standards, History of the Standards
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Definitions (final)

Postby johnleeke » June 6th, 2011, 9:32 am

“The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." --Socrates

Following are definitions used in the development and use of these Standards:

Window
An opening in the wall of a building with parts that operate to control the passage of light and air. Real windows are durable, that is they are designed with details and built with quality materials so they will last for a century or more with only modest maintenance that can be easily implemented with basic materials.

Standards
These standards are a basis for comparison. They are a reference point against which window work can be evaluated. These standards set a measure for window preservation work.

Treatment
Any specific action taken or thing done to a window or any of its parts or systems. For example: renewing a broken pane of glass, repairing a rotten sash joint, adding an exterior storm window.

Preservation
"Preservation places a high premium on the retention of all historic fabric through conservation, maintenance and repair. It reflects a building's continuum over time, through successive occupancies, and the respectful changes and alterations that are made."
(Source: The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties)

“Actions taken to keep the form and extent of a building as it now exists. Essentially, historic preservation is a form of maintenance that focuses on historic or architectural character.”
(Source: Practical Restoration Report, Managing Maintenance, by John Leeke, p. 8)

Restoration
“Restoration recovers the form and details of a building by removing later work and replacing missing original elements to make the building appear as it did at some particular time in the past. This includes replication of historic features based on physical evidence, historical documentation and research.”
(Source: Practical Restoration Report, Managing Maintenance, by John Leeke, p. 9)

Window Preservation
Window Preservation is maintaining, repairing and upgrading older and historic windows. This is a creative process that depends on knowledgeable and skilled workers. A typical window preservation project saves all of the existing windows. The emphasis is on craftspeople earning a living by doing best work, providing for the needs of the occupants and the building owner, while sustaining local economies.

Replacement Windows
Replacement windows are factory made products that are aggressively marketed to the American consumer and remodeling and renovation contractors. A typical window replacement project includes removing all of the existing sashes or entire windows in a building, throwing them away and replacing them with newly manufactured products.

Arris
The sharp edge or ridge formed by two surfaces meeting at an angle, as on a molding or a glazing rabbet.

Glazing
1. Glazing is the window industry’s term for anything to do with windows, especially the panes and all of the parts and systems that hold the panes into the walls.
2. Glazing is the material and parts that hold the pane into the immediately surrounding frame including putty, sealants, points, wood and rubber or plastic strips.
3. Glazing is the action of putting those materials and parts in place.

Renewal
Removing all of a deteriorated window part, making a new part and placing it into the window.

Sash, Sashes
The wooden framework that holds the glass panes.
In popular language the plural of sash is “sashes.” In the jargon of the window industry it is common to use the form “sash,” meaning many sashes. Both forms of the plural are used in these Standards and both forms are correct. Usually “sashes” is used when the writing is meant for a popular audience, and “sash” is used when the writing is technical and meant for the window professional.

(Check the images below for window part names. If you use different names, please let us know by clicking on "post reply.")

(If you would like to comment on these definitions, or have definitions for other terms to submit, or are just wondering what some window-related word means, please click on "Post Reply" below.)
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John
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http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
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Re: Definitions

Postby johnleeke » June 6th, 2011, 9:44 am

What "standard" means to me, and why do we even need standards in the first place?

In my own trades work I have my own shop standards. I call them 'standards' because they are more than simply 'the way I do things.' Many tradespeople and shops have 'the way' they do things. They recall the last time they did it and do it the same way again. This depends on memory and 'the way' often drifts over the long-term; a step gets left out, or a different material is used or another worker has another way. Along 'the way' the result of the work changes, which might be good--or not good. Or a key employee is lost, and all of "the ways" she knew are gone.

My dad taught me to keep 'work notes' and early in my work career these written notes became my 'standards'. Benefits: I can exactly recreate a result for a piece of work I have not done in 30 years. When I go back and see a piece of my work has failed I can look up exactly how I did it, which helps find the cause, and update my written standard to include the improvement. After that all my work of that type is improved. Over the decades this adds up to pretty good work and very consistent results, my work lasts longer, I have fewer call backs, work more effectively, make more money, etc. If I am lost someone could pick up my standards binder and be likely to carry on my work with very similar results. (Those of you who have read my articles and publications over the years are often looking at my written standards. After a few decades of proven performance I'm comfortable enough with my standards to share them with some confidence that others will find them useful.) So, that's why I support the idea that a set of standards we could all follow would benefit us all.

I suggest this current endeavor is not to establish training programs, certify workers, write model specifications or educate the American public in why our work is important (although these are important things that would be good to do), but this endeavor is to begin in a small way to set a few standards that will serve us in our work and business. By limiting the scope we can actually come up with something definite and useful within a fairly short time, say a few months at most.

Some have said via email that the term "standard" is getting in our way. Review the definitions above and let us know what you think. I suggest we call this "setting standard guidelines", which would let us pick and choose and still get something done.

Once we have develop this first set of standard guidelines we can see how they work, revise them if needed, expand on them, develop new ones, etc.

(to comment, please click on "post reply" below)
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
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Re: Definitions

Postby johnleeke » August 28th, 2011, 6:25 pm

What is your name for this type of woodworking joint where the meeting rail joins with the stile?

Image
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

johnleeke
Posts: 375
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 7:34 pm
Full Name: John Leeke
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Organization: Historic HomeWorks
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Location: Portland, Maine
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Re: Definitions (draft)

Postby johnleeke » January 13th, 2012, 9:24 am

I noticed that some timber framers who were making some sash called this a "bridle joint with half dovetail."
John
Standards Co-Founder
Standards Editor

http://www.HistoricHomeWorks.com


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